Secretly Recording Meetings: Misconduct? Entrapment?

Are secret recordings admissible?

In unfair dismissal cases, both the compensatory and basic awards can be reduced by the tribunal, potentially to zero, based on the employee's conduct before dismissal. Secret recordings of meetings by an employee can be admissible evidence in cases if the tribunal thinks it is relevant. However, secretly recording a meeting might amount to misconduct, depending on the employer's rules.

Meeting with HR secretly recorded

In Phoenix House v Stockman, the employee was unhappy about a restructure. She secretly recorded a meeting with HR. As part of an unfair dismissal claim, the tribunal accepted the employee's explanation that she recorded the meeting because she felt flustered rather than to entrap the employer. They reduced her compensatory award by 10 per cent because of her conduct.

The employer appealed, saying they would have dismissed the employee for gross misconduct had they known about the secret recording so her compensation should be reduced to nil. They said the secret recording was a breach of trust and confidence.

Are secret recordings entrapment or misconduct?

The Employment Appeal Tribunal upheld the tribunal's decision. In the past, it was fair to assume that covert recordings were part of a plan to entrap the employer. These days, mobile phone technology makes it easier and more common to record meetings.

Whilst secretly recording a meeting might usually amount to misconduct (except in the most pressing of circumstances), it isn't necessarily gross misconduct. In this case, covert recording was not listed as a gross misconduct offence in the employer's disciplinary rules.

Undermining trust and confidence

A secret recording doesn't necessarily undermine trust and confidence either because it can happen for different reasons such as record keeping or to assist with getting legal advice. The EAT found that the tribunal was entitled to reduce compensation by only 10 per cent. The tribunal had correctly looked at the chances of the employee being fairly dismissed had the employer known about the recording.

This case gives employers helpful guidance on secret recordings at a time when every employee carries a device which can secretly record events. Employers may want to include covert recording of meetings as a specific example of gross misconduct in their disciplinary policies and ensure that employees understand the potential ramifications.

Kate Fretten, Employment Partner says “Employers take note. Review your policies and check whether covert recording of meetings is listed as a specific example of gross misconduct in your disciplinary policies.  If you do not want employees to record meetings then you should expressly tell them at the beginning of a meeting.”

At Frettens, all of our solicitors offer a free initial meeting or chat on the phone to answer your questions. If this article raises issues for you or your business, please call us on 01202 499255 Kate or Paul will be happy to discuss it with you.

 

 

 

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